There are many ways to protect your systems, but in today’s world, it takes a little more than the basics. Watch this video to learn more about what enterprises are using to protect their businesses, including the use of cloud security and IoT solutions.

 

 

There are many ways information can be spoofed or hacked. It is important to protect your information by using DNS security. Not only organizations are vulnerable to hacking. Everything within your home is vulnerable too. From your cell phone to your television. If it connects to the internet, it has a vulnerability factor to it.

Don’t be tricked by the spoofer or caught by the hacker. Let ThreatStop stop the threat before it has a chance to penetrate your systems and do any damage. Contact one of our knowledgable experts today and get started protecting your systems.

 

Learn More:

DNS Defense Cloud / Threat Stop

Security Solutions for Enterprises

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Video Transcript

Timestamps

0:00 Intro
0:05 Standard Enterprise
0:09 Having IoT At Home
1:33 Having IoT At Your Organization
2:10 Having IoT In Hospitals
0:05 Standard Enterprise
So if I take a look at your network, what is it you have to protect?

Well, you have a bunch of enterprise workload in the cloud, and that's one set of techniques. You have laptops from Nutella workers that is in a coffee shop. How do you protect them? You have your traditional network, and then you have your internet of things. That could be heating, that could be air conditioning, that could be lighting. That's an area of your network exposure that most people don't pay attention to, but is one of the really important emerging threat vectors.

0:09 Having IoT At Home

You might say, well I don't have any internet of things. Well, in your home, if you have, you know, wi-fi routers or if you have file servers or if you have a chromecast device, you've got an internet of things. This is just a few examples

I met a hacker in Portugal once. He said the best thing to attack in a home network is a file server. It's always on, has lots of space to store things, and it probably is based on an old OS with known vulnerabilities. So I start there. Your TV set is downloading buttons using http and I didn't slur that and miss the s at the end. There are a bunch of TVs out there that the menus are coming down via http, so that could easily be spoofed. So even in the home it's an important thing.

1:33 Having IoT At Your Organization

In your organization, you have printers. Those have been hijacked. You have people who are bringing their own devices, their own cell phones or whatever. They have heating and air conditioning. One of the case studies that we did was at Scripps, a research institute in La Jolla, and one of the things that got infected there was the access control for their bio safety lab. Sounds scary? It is. Maintenance, another vector well known. So you have IoT in most organizations today.

2:10 Having IoT In Hospitals

If you want to be really scary, you can think about your hospital. That's a robotic surgery machine. You might say, oh okay, and it's computer controlled of course, but if you want to patch its security, well first of all you've got to get permission from the government. The government certifies these things as being good for medical use. You can't change it without getting the government to agree. You have to get agreement from the company that's leasing the machine to the hospital. Oh, and you need the patches in the first place.

So you know, there's a bunch of scary stuff that's out there. And so one of the things that this means is that you may want to have different rules for the part of your network that's handling these internet of things devices than you do from the part of your network that's full of computers that have antivirus.

Again, this is sort of the ideal situation.